Election Issues

Student Loans: Where Do the Candidates Stand?

At a staggering $1.23 trillion and rising, student loan debt is a hot topic for young voters. But where do the Presidential candidates stand?

By  COURTNEY BROOKSMEGHAN DEMARIA | SOURCE: Refinery29 | April 22, 2016


PHOTO: JUSTIN SULLIVAN/ GETTY IMAGES

PHOTO: JUSTIN SULLIVAN/ GETTY IMAGES

DONALD TRUMP

Where He Stands: Trump has not proposed a comprehensive education plan. In an interview with The Hill last July, he said that the federal government shouldn't profit from federal student loans, an issue on which he agrees with Democrats like Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren. His own work on higher education has been scrutinized, however. Trump University, an unaccredited for-profit university the presidential candidate launched in 2005, is the subject of multiple lawsuits, including a pending class-action suit. He's defended the venture multiple times.

You could cut that [The Department of Education] way, way, way down.
— Donald Trump

PHOTO: ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG/GETTY IMAGES

PHOTO: ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG/GETTY IMAGES

HILLARY CLINTON

Where She Stands: A "debt-free" plan at public colleges and universities through increased access to tuition grants and income-based repayment plans, and lower current loan interest rates. Clinton's presidential campaign platform includes the "New College Compact," which promises that students who attend public colleges "should never have to borrow to pay for tuition, books, and fees to attend a four-year public college in their state," according to her campaign website. Her proposal would also allow student loan borrowers to refinance their loans at current rates, CNBC explains, and the plan would cost about $350 billion over a 10-year period. While the plan may sound good to students, even liberal allies have questioned whether Republicans would get on board with this proposal.

No family and no student should have to borrow to pay tuition at a public college or university… And everyone who has student debt should be able to finance it at lower rates.
— Hillary Clinton

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