Election 2016

What the Electoral College Map Would Look Like If Only Millennials Voted

By Celeste Katz | October 25, 2016 | SOURCE: Mic | PHOTO: Getty Images

A real-time Electoral College tracking map suggests not only a disappointing Election Day for presidential hopeful Donald Trump, but potential trouble down the road for the Republican Party he represents.

A Mic sneak peek at a new interactive map from SurveyMonkey, shows Democrat Hillary Clinton ahead not just overall in Electoral College projections, but with an overwhelming advantage among millennial voters.

Clinton has a nearly nationwide advantage over Trump with millennials. Source: SurveyMonkey

Clinton has a nearly nationwide advantage over Trump with millennials.

Source: SurveyMonkey

A total of 270 Electoral College votes are required to capture the presidency.

In the 2016 election cycle, 69 million millennials are eligible to vote — a number equal to that of baby boomers.

According to SurveyMonkey, which is offering mapping based on more than 30,000 interviews conducted since Oct. 8 and weighted by state-level voter demographics, Clinton dominates among the younger set.

"The data among millennials point to big and widespread advantages for Clinton heading into the final stretch. The challenges some Democrats feared she might face with young voters after a tough primary fight against Bernie Sanders haven't materialized," Jon Cohen, SurveyMonkey's chief research officer, said to Mic.

That's not all.

"Looking beyond 2016, the numbers among white millennials may be particularly troubling for Republican strategists," Cohen said, pointing to data that backs up longstanding fears about the future of the GOP in the absence of a successful effort to broaden its base. 

"Trump is ahead in only 17 states among young white voters," Cohen noted. 

Trump does better among white millennials, but still trails Clinton. Source: SurveyMonkey

Trump does better among white millennials, but still trails Clinton.

Source: SurveyMonkey

"In addition to the headwinds the party faces among nonwhite voters of all ages, this deficit adds to the party's obstacles ahead."

After a scorching post-mortem conducted after Republican Mitt Romney's loss to President Barack Obama in 2012, the GOP made some effort to ramp up its outreach to nonwhite voters.

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